Learning Connectors in English (with examples)

When communicating in another language, especially when it is in the language of Shakespeare, the sentences in English help us to give quick and simple answers. They are nothing complicated to do or use, and have a general structure on which you can work to enrich them much more.

Discover in this article the different types of sentences in English and the structure in them so you can use them whenever you want. I hope this orientation helps you understand how to learn English as fast as you practice.

The first thing to know is that the sentences in English in terms of order or syntax are practically identical. That is, they are composed of a subject, a verb, and a predicate.

This will be our starting point to see the different types of prayer:

Affirmative sentences (affirmative sentences):

Affirmative sentences in English are those used to affirm a fact or situation. In the case of English, working with the same structure:

Subject + Verb + Preached

Some examples:

My dog ​​is black. My dog ​​is black.

She is 7 years old. She is 7 years old.

You have a big apartment. You have a large apartment.

Negative sentences ( Negative sentences )

In the case of negative sentences in English, they are used to report something incorrect or express denials in assumptions, facts, and situations. It has the same structure as an affirmative sentence in English, with the difference that the verb is accompanied by its auxiliary and the not (denial).

Subject + auxiliary + not + verb + predicate

Let’s see its application:

I don’t want hotcakes from breakfast. I don’t want pancakes for breakfast.

Are we not going to buy any tickets tonight? Won’t we buy tickets tonight?

A couple of rules that we have to keep in mind when it comes to negative sentences in English are:

Auxiliary verbs ( I do, be, have), in this case, we are using do that is present and did in the past. They go before the infinitive verb.

Contractions DO + NOT, which are common: do not, and DID NOT +: did not.

Comparative sentences (sentences comparative )

In the case of comparative sentences in English, they are used to make clear the comparison between two objects or situations together with their adjectives in degree of comparison. In this case, the structure of the comparative sentence in English is:

Subject (name) + verb + comparative adjective + than + name (object or other person)

Remember that the most frequent comparative adjectives for sentences are smaller, larger, faster, higher, better.

Here are some examples:

My car is faster than yours. My car is faster than yours.

This cake is smaller than the plate. This cake is smaller than the plate.

That ball flew higher than our window. That ball flew higher than our window.

Superlative sentences ( Superlative sentences )

In the case of superlative sentences in English, it is to indicate the extremes (upper and lower) in which a person, situation or objects are located. Normally, in the sentences, our main subject is compared making a more marked difference.

Subject (name) + verb + the + superlative adjective + object

In the case of the most used superlatives we have: largest, workshop, smallest, fastest, highest.

Present Simple sentences (sentences simple present)

The present simple sentences in English are used to comment on the things we are used to doing. Yes, all conjugated in the present. The structure is usually similar to affirmative sentences:

Subject + Present verb + Preached

Some examples of these sentences:

I work with my best friend in the agency. I work with my best friend in the agency.

You look like my father. You look like my father.

She works for me. She works for me.

Sentences in past simple (simple past Prayers)

Now, when we talk about past simple sentences in English, we mean events that were done before or to talk about frequent actions and habits in the past. Its structure is as follows:

Subject + past verb + predicate

In this case, remember to correctly conjugate past verbs (-ed, -d, -ied or irregular verbs in English, depending on the case).

Here are some examples of this structure:

She studied chemistry 4 years ago. She studied chemistry 4 years ago.

My father worked in a factory last summer. My father worked in a factory last summer.

We’re in Paris last week. We were in Paris last week.

Interrogative sentences ( Interrogative sentences )

Finally, let’s talk about interrogative sentences in English, which are used to establish questions. Let’s look at the structure of these sentences below:

Interrogative word + auxiliary + verb + predicate

Disjunctive connectors in English

We continue with the disjunctive connectors. These are used to offer one or more alternatives to the idea initially proposed, although sometimes they also express circumstances, which means that they mention the fact that may occur if the other event proposed is not fulfilled.

Let’s see which ones are the most used:

or

This connector serves to indicate that there are options to choose from and is expressed as you will see in the example.

Example: You can eat chocolate or ice cream

You can eat chocolate or ice cream

either

We use either attached to or connector to point out that the following is the first of two alternatives that relate to the same idea. Let’s see it more clearly in the next sentence.

Example: My future little sibling can be either a boy or a girl

My future little brother or sister can be a boy or a girl

neither […] nor = no […] nor

When you want to deny both parts of a sentence or reject the proposed alternatives, you can use the nor connector with the nor particle.

Example: I will neither go to the park or to the cinema

I won’t go to the park or the movies

wether […] or = if […] or

This connector resembles the or connector and you can use it to offer options.

Example: You have to decide whether will go climbing or will go swimming

You have to decide if you’re going to climb or go swimming.

or else =

Usually, we use the or else connector to indicate the consequences of an action that has not occurred.

Example: We need to study, or else we will not pass the test

otherwise = otherwise

Finally, we have the connector otherwise, which serves to express the result of not following a suggestion that is normally given in the first sentence.

Sequential connectors in English

We only have to learn the sequential connectors in English, these serve to narrate the events in a certain chronological order, following order or a sequence of events. Let’s see what they are.

at first = at the beginning

The first sequence connector we have is the first connector, which serves to reflect the events that happened at the beginning of a situation that takes place in the present or that already took place in the past.

Example: At first, I wanted to go to the beach. Now I want to go to the cinema

At first, I wanted to go to the beach. Now I want to go to the movies.

to start with /, to begin with

These connectors work in the same way, so they can replace each other. If you are wondering what it is for, they are used to refer to the first stage of a process. Take a closer look at the example.

Example: Felix bought the vegetables and fruits to start with the diet

Felix bought the vegetables and fruits to start the diet

firstly, secondly, thirdly = secondly, thirdly

The following connectors serve to list elements related to the same idea.

Example: I’m planning my next trip. Firstly, I will visit Madrid; secondly, I will visit Rome and thirdly, I will visit Paris.

You are planning my next trip. Firstly, I will visit Madrid; secondly, I will visit Rome and thirdly, I will visit Paris.

after that = after that

With the after that connector, we can indicate an action that is carried out just after a previous action has been completed.

Example: Pedro went climbing. After that, he went swimming.

Peter went climbing. After that, he went nadir.

afterward = after, later

This connector works just like the after that connector, which means that we can use it as a substitute.

Example: My grandma found a small hole in my sweater. Afterward, she sewed up it.

My grandma found a small hole in my sweater. Later, she sewed it up.

then = then / later

We continue with the connector then, which serves to indicate past, present or future actions that depend on another event. Let’s look at the example.

Example: I put all my stuff inside my suitcase and then left.

I put all my stuff inside my suitcase and then left.

in the beginning / end / final

Now we find the connectors in the beginning and in the end. The first one helps us to describe a fact at the beginning of an event, while the second one is used to indicate the end of an event.

Example: In the beginning, we were all sad. In the end, we all had a big smile on our faces.

In the beginning, we were all sad. In the end, we all had a big smile on our faces.

eventually / finally = finally

These connectors are synonymous and you can use them as you see fit, as long as it is to describe the outcome of an event.

Example: She studied for the test and finally she passed

She studied for the exam and finally passed

at present = for now

With the at present connector, you can talk about a present situation that could change in the future. If you don’t understand it, look at the example and you will surely do it.

Example: I live in Madrid at the present but I would like to move to Valencia

last of all/lastly

Both connectors are synonymous and you can use them to refer to the last event in a series of events that have been happening.

Example: Firstly, they went to the supermarket; secondly, they came back home; lastly they cooked dinner.

Firstly, they went to the supermarket; secondly, they came back home; lastly, they cooked dinner.

meanwhile = meanwhile

On the other hand, we have the meanwhile connector, which expresses an action that develops simultaneously with another. Pay attention to the following sentence to see how to use it.

Example: My mom is cleaning the living room; meanwhile, I am cleaning my room

My mom’s cleaning the living room, meanwhile, I’m cleaning my room

later = after / later

The side connector serves to indicate an action that will take place in the future or an action that will occur shortly after some event.

Example: John  has to go to the store but he will do it later

Carlos has to go to the store but he’ll do it later

next = next

Finally, we have the next connector, which we can use to express actions that will occur in succession.

Example: I have a yoga class and next a pilates class

I have a yoga class, and then a Pilates class.

We have finished and, now that you know the connectors in English and how to use them, we recommend that you practice writing sentences similar to those in the examples, so that you get used to them and pick up the thread quickly. This way, you will be able to enrich your speeches and make them more fluent, either in written or oral form.

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